Public Awareness

New Sewer Developments

The City of New Iberia owns and maintains its sewer collection facilities and two treatment plants. The collection system experiences severe infiltration/inflow (I/I) problems due to the system’s age and the environment of the area. Infiltration and inflow is caused by an excessive amount of rainwater or groundwater entering the sewer system through defects in the system. Sewer systems are not designed to handle this excessive water, thus the system becomes surcharged and sewer system overflows (SSOs) occur. These overflows discharge to ditches and other surface waters, where children may be exposed to harmful bacteria that can lead to serious illnesses.

Due to the recurring problems of the City of New Iberia’s sewer system, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued a series of Administrative Orders directing the City to address its problems. Despite its strained finances, the City has aggressively attacked its deteriorating sewer system, through grants and State Revolving Loan funding. The City proactively moved forward with, and has completed, a new pump station, force main and wastewater treatment plant to handle these excessive flows and to plan for future growth.

Despite its efforts, the City’s sewer system continues to experience some SSOs and bypasses. These non-compliances lead to the negotiation of a Consent Decree between the City of New Iberia, the U.S. Department of Justice, the U.S. E.P.A., and the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality, wherein the City agreed to take detailed measures to address its sewer problems. The work previously performed toward rehabilitation, the construction of a new pump station, forcemain and wastewater treatment plant, along with the other demands on this municipality related to the safety and well-being of its citizens, have strained the City’s finances, making it necessary to seek outside sources of funding to meet the requirements of the Consent Decree.

The new wastewater treatment plant, known as the Sucrose Drive Wastewater Treatment Plant, is capable of handling sewer flows that were previously sent to the Tete Bayou Wastewater Treatment Plant. By re-directing these flows, the City will reduce the excessive flows sent to the Tete Bayou Plant during rain events, reducing the occurrence of excursions at the plant. This improvement in compliance will lead to improved surface water quality of the discharge streams to which the Tete Bayou Plant discharges, as well as reduction of the occurrence of SSOs at the Landry Drive Pump Station (P.S. D-7).

The City proposes to achieve the re-routing of sewer flows from the Tete Bayou Plant to the Sucrose Drive Plant through two projects, Flow Re-Routing Phase I, and Flow Re-Routing Phase II.

Phase I includes the addition of a new pump in the existing Pump Station B-1, and utilizes an existing 8” force main that currently discharges to P.S. B-1, reversing the flow, then extending this force main to discharge to the Admiral Doyle Pump Station, which carries flow via a 30” force main to the new Sucrose Drive Plant. It also includes the installation of a 16” force main to carry future sewer flow from a developing part of the City. Installing this force main along with the re-routed force main will save considerable time and money, allowing the City to have infrastructure in place in anticipation of need, and allowing for economic development in the City.

The Phase II project includes reversing the flow in an existing 10” force main that currently discharges to Pump Station D-7 (Landry Drive Pump Station), and upgrading Pump Station D-1 (Anderson Street Pump Station), so that it can re-pump the re-routed flow to the new Sucrose Drive Plant. It also includes the installation of a 10” force main to carry future sewer flow from a developing part of the City.  Installing this force main along with the re-routed force main will save considerable time and money, allowing the City to have the infrastructure in place in anticipation of need, and allowing for economic development in the City. This re-routing will take a considerable amount of flow off of P.S. D-7, which currently overflows during certain wet-weather events.